DHH @dhh Creator of Ruby on Rails, Founder & CTO at Basecamp, NYT best-selling author, and Le Mans 24h class-winning racing driver. Jan. 21, 2019 1 min read

Google found in clear violation of the GDPR, and the price starts with a 50 million euro fine for past transgressions. Should Google not remedy its behavior, GDPR ultimately allows for fines up to 4% of global turnover. This is real progress!  https://www.cnil.fr/en/cnils-restricted-committee-imposes-financial-penalty-50-million-euros-against-google-llc 

What's striking about this judgement is just how plainly the violations are detailed, and how clear it is that Google is not going to weasel out of compliance by evading informed consent by its normal tactics of obfuscation. This is a potential game changer for online privacy.

If GDPR is actually going to be enforce like this going forward, and it's not just a one-off French expedition, the entire business model of Google and Facebook as it pertains to using personal information for ad targeting is in doubt. ABOUT BLOODY TIME!

What's interesting here is that Google is actually in a better position to weather this sea change than Facebook. If Google had to go back to only relying on context (what did you search for, where are you going), they're much better off than if Facebook had to.

What this judgement also highlights, though, is that Google's abusive of personal information and their failure to seek informed consent is a major liability. On the PR front, they've mostly been able to shield behind Facebook's comical evil, but casual abuse won't stay hidden.


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