Natalia Antonova 🐱🔔 @NataliaAntonova Writer. Biocentric universe stan. Blue rose. @waraxandnatasha co-host. @bellingcat editor. Bylines: @guardian, @washingtonpost, @voxdotcom Mar. 29, 2019 3 min read

Since some of you asked about my favorite Ukrainian & Russian dishes/staple ingredients, how about a short thread?

Subjective, mostly un-fancy, specific to a few regions, but fun!

Featuring a few old dishes & new trends.

There will be berries! #UkrainianFood #RussianFood

So let’s start with the Russians, because as a Kyiv-born person, they were always more “exotic” to me.

Grandma & grandpa knew how to forage for mushrooms.

Various takes on white mushrooms with butter and cracked black pepper = some of my favorite culinary memories.

Grandma made vegetarian “green borscht” with eggs and green onion.

You can easily make this borscht with meat too, but I’d go for beef and not pork with this version.

(I think pork pairs better with beet borscht, which, to me, is a more Ukrainian dish anyway)

Favorite Russian sauce for fowl: Probably lingonberry sauce, which can come with a touch of juniper - though I think the juniper can make it more of a steak sauce.

It otherwise pairs especially well with duck.

My dad actually used to hunt duck. Yes, like when stuff was scarce.

Nothing beats blini with caviar - whether red or black.

It’s an adventure in texture!

A lot of people think that picking the caviar is the most important part.

But you also have to make sure the blini are thin and delicate enough. It’s definitely a kind of craft.

Russian pelmeni are a treat to make at home.

Until I was much older, I’d never tried venison pelmeni. They have since become my favorite option.

A lot of people serve them with sour cream, I go for the butter + black pepper option, myself.

Traditional Russian black salt can give any boring dish a punch.

I especially like how it makes soft boiled eggs... eggier.

A great addition to your arsenal when more elaborate food is unavailable/unaffordable, as I know very well ❤️❤️

Innovation and cultural cross-pollination means that the pike, a Russian staple, is now frequently served in burger form!

Some people love it with egg, I love it with a mild garlic sauce.

(You can also do both)

Switching gears, let quail eggs & duck eggs serve as a bridge between Russian and Ukrainian kitchens - both camps swear by them.

I prefer quail eggs in salad.

Duck eggs can be poached in plastic wrap w/ horseradish sauce, etc. (remember: they take longer than regular eggs!)

If you’re one of those people who like to make mayonnaise at home (a distinctly Slavic freak flag to fly, I find), try making it with quail eggs!

My Ukrainian grandmother, God rest her, this turned that seemingly boring condiment into an art form.

Ukrainian salo can be consumed in a variety of ways - it’s simple & delicious.

For me, nothing beats thinly sliced salo with crushed garlic and toasted black bread

Fried salo bits pair excellently with varenyki (Ukrainian dumplings, prefer those with potato & mushroom filling!)

My favorite raspberry that grows in Ukraine is actually the Bulgarian Ruby (болгарский рубин) variety.

I dump whole berries into black tea in the summers.

It’s a great jam staple.

Pour cream over it & add a bit of sugar.

Also - raspberry crumble cake is 👌🏻👌🏻

Ukrainian banosh is a delicious, often overlooked dish

Want to give it a modern twist? Try pairing it with soft French cheese of your choice (as opposed to more traditional brynza cheese)

The banosh in this pic is from Kyiv’s Kanapa 👌🏻👌🏻

I find that nobody does baked trout quite like the Ukrainians do.

Sour cream-based sauces make it especially interesting.

One mustn’t forget lemon too 😍😍

Deruny are potato pancakes - this thread wouldn’t be complete without potatoes - are something that everyone should try at least once.

A lot of people like to eat them with mushrooms.

I really, REALLY like to serve them with spinach.

I better stop, because adding to this thread all day has been making me extremely hungry lolol

Let me know about any unusual/interesting/simply good Ukrainian & Russian dishes, if you feel like sharing

Stay delicious ❤️❤️


You can follow @NataliaAntonova.



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