Charity Majors @mipsytipsy CTO @honeycombio, ex-Parse, Facebook, Linden Lab; cowrote Database Reliability Engineering; loves whiskey, rainbows. I test in production and so do you. ๐ŸŒˆ๐Ÿ–ค May. 10, 2019 3 min read

we are a relatively distributed team -- flawed, but committed and working on it -- but we have no headcount. ๐Ÿ˜”

... but if even half of you kittens who want to work here would first become *customers* of ours, that would change. ๐Ÿค—๐Ÿ

i've said this before, but i'm gonna pull on this thread a bit because i've been thinking about it a lot this week.

you are right. this IS how you want to develop software. this is how EVERYBODY should develop software. IT IS BETTER HERE. not even a little, but a lot.

but for the kind of changes we are trying to help codify and drive to actually take over the world, we can't just make the world a better place for people who work at @honeycombio.

no single company can hire or save a generation. this co is just the working lab.

better observability is like a keystone species. without it, the ecosystem falls apart. you need this. it is a necessary building block for a better developer lifestyle.

it is a necessary prerequisite for software ownership et al, but not sufficient.

as @lizthegrey says, this is a socio-technical problem

we are doing our best to live our values, and to experiment on ourselves first, but we will only really change the world for users and engineers if we can enable others to do the same in their orgs.

all of us are rooted in a time and place and people that we care about. all of us have the desire to improve the places we call home.

we've been so heads down trying to scratch out a survival existence, we haven't had the cycles to invest here, but we know it.

the companies that have been successful with honeycomb have been the ones where we have an ally on the ground; someone who believes that things can be better, and fights to try.

(once they try us, they don't go back <3)

socio-technical problems have socio-technical solutions. observability, ownership, user-centered design, a culture of human dignity and respect ... these build on each other in empowering ways.

this shit works, y'all. it's not a vendor pitch, it's the lived experience of many.

if you're out there thinking "i wish i could work at honeycomb"... i would love to chat with you about how you can bring elements of honeycomb culture back into your own place of work.

i'm down for a 15 min call with as many folks as i can fit in to my schedule. DM me.

i've been in these salt mines since i was 17. over half my life.

i started this company because it was the first and only glimmer of hope i had ever seen that things could actually be different. that life could actually change for grunts like me, on the ground/on call.

maybe we'll fail. most startups fail. we've failed a million times already, but we're still here, for now.

one of the biggest headwinds we're fighting is learned helplessness. people's inability to envision or fight for a better tomorrow, and fallback to masochism.

understandable, but self-fulfilling. "if you can't see it, you can't be it" -- right?

i'm ๐Ÿ’ฏ for leaving bad job situations. but while it works for the individual, it isn't replicable and doesn't scale. we need to figure out how to drive these changes on a global scale.

(dear @lena_lebt, thanks for letting me riff off your super-sweet tweet about @o11ycast and honeycomb. i wish we could hire you too -- maybe someday! if you'd like to chat about anything, my DMs are open, i'd love to hear from you. โ˜บ๏ธ)


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