Los Angeles Times @latimes Bringing L.A. to the world and the world to L.A. Subscribe now: checkout2.latimes.com/ May. 21, 2019 1 min read

Emma Taylor’s grit helped her get to where she is today — finishing up her first year of teaching and preparing for graduate school at Loyola Marymount University.  https://lat.ms/2VAz1Mp 

So did exhaustive evaluations throughout her years in school, which helped discern how her brain worked so she could figure out how to learn.  https://lat.ms/2VAz1Mp 

So did accommodations, including extended time, in classrooms and testing centers like the one where she took the ACT.

So did the hundreds of thousands of dollars her parents spent on therapists and tutors and private schools.  https://lat.ms/2VAz1Mp 

Her evaluations were detailed; her accommodations, valid and necessary. They stand in contrast to the schemes employed by parents to guarantee their kids entry to some of the nation’s most prestigious schools, which became the college admissions scandal  https://lat.ms/2Hrmes4 

The stories that emerged in the scandal are a reminder of the ego and arrogance sometimes associated with wealth and privilege.

Taylor’s story is a reminder that an estimated 10% of the population has a learning disability and could legitimately benefit from extra help.

Read more from @marialaganga, with photos by @MelMelconPhoto, in today’s Column One:  https://lat.ms/2VAz1Mp 


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