Charity Majors @mipsytipsy CTO @honeycombio, ex-Parse, Facebook, Linden Lab; cowrote Database Reliability Engineering; loves whiskey, rainbows. I test in production and so do you. 🌈🖤 May. 22, 2019 1 min read

Every company I know of with >40 eng is systematically underinvesting in release engineering -- and paying a heavy price for it.

It isn't any one thing you can point to, it's more like a syndrome or a symptoms list:

🎈people may need to plan their whole day around a merge
⏰ or you have to find someone and ask them to deploy your code
🏮 you often have to coordinate with others just to merge or deploy

🕹 multiple people drop what they're doing to stare anxiously at aggregate graphs when new code rolls out
📸 a failed deploy may take hours or days to restore to normalcy
📟 a failed deploy means all hands on deck
🎲 no distinction exists between deploys and releases

🍇 your deploy tooling has no owner
🍉 or it has an owner, and nobody else has ever contributed to it/ it is exempt from normal code review policy
🥭 nobody has committed any changes to your deploy code recently; "everybody just knows" where the bugs live

🧵 contiguous roadmap time is never allocated to improving CI/CD, nor are senior engineers attached to it
🍩 nobody is tracking how long it takes to build, deploy, or run tests. No manager's perf review cites these stats.
🏏 regressions go unnoticed, improvements unheralded.

and the biggest tells of all

♟ nobody has confidence *at all* that a given deploy is not going to lead to a miserable loss of multiple days of their life

🎱a generalized anxiety, fear, and avoidance of prod pervades engineering. Often enforced by tired ops teams.


You can follow @mipsytipsy.



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