Los Angeles Times @latimes Bringing L.A. to the world and the world to L.A. Subscribe now: checkout2.latimes.com/ May. 31, 2019 1 min read

Four years ago, Julian Leyzaola was shot twice in the chest, once in the neck and once in the back in the Mexican border city of Juarez. It was the last bullet that left him paralyzed from the waist down. More from correspondent @katelinthicum:  https://lat.ms/2Mgy24q 

Leyzaola cultivated a reputation for exaggerated displays of toughness as a former soldier and police chief . At one crime scene, he famously punched a corpse in the face.  https://lat.ms/2Mgy24q 

As police chief, Leyzaola fought drug traffickers and helped bring down crime in violence-plagued Tijuana and Juarez, making him a hero to many — and a pariah to human rights advocates who call him “torturer-in-chief.” 📸: @gary_coronado  https://lat.ms/2Mgy24q 

After the shooting that paralyzed him from the waist down, Leyzaola decided that instead of leading a police force, he could lead a city. He’s now running for mayor in Tijuana. Follow along on his campaign trail below 📽️: @JessicaQChen  https://lat.ms/2Mgy24q 

Analysts say Leyzaola has a good shot at winning. His candidacy has a hold on the one issue that dwarfs all others: how to calm the violence that has transformed Tijuana into one of the world’s deadliest cities. 📸: @gary_coronado  https://lat.ms/2Mgy24q 

How did Tijuana become one of the deadliest cities on Earth? Correspondent @katelinthicum explains:  https://lat.ms/2MEUHny 


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