Los Angeles Times @latimes Bringing L.A. to the world and the world to L.A. Subscribe now: checkout2.latimes.com/ Jun. 06, 2019 1 min read

Wendy Matney has been to the hospital enough to know a trip means thousands of dollars in bills under the family’s high-deductible health plan.

And she and her husband — struggling with more than $20,000 in medical debt — can afford no more.  https://lat.ms/2WSbMSo 

The steep rise in health insurance deductibles over the last decade has saddled insured, middle- and working-class Americans with medical bills they can’t afford, a Times examination of job-based insurance shows.  https://lat.ms/2WLNE42 

But the biggest impact has been on people like Matney who have illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and epilepsy that require regular medications and consistent care.  https://lat.ms/2WSbMSo 

Matney has a form of epilepsy that causes frequent seizures. Just a few months after her wedding, she had a major seizure. Fearing for her life, her husband called 911. An ambulance took her to a community hospital, where doctors ran tests. The bills ran to thousands of dollars.

Half of all Americans in a job-based health plan say they or an immediate family member have delayed a doctor’s appointment, not filled a prescription or postponed medical care in the last year because of cost, a Times and @KaiserFamFound survey found.  http://bit.ly/2WMBTu2 

As drug prices skyrocket and deductibles increase, sick Americans now pay thousands of dollars every year to get care they need. Those with chronic conditions are hit even harder.

Read more from @NoamLevey here:  https://lat.ms/2WSbMSo 


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