Note: This thread is related to #Coronavirus #COVID19

Follow the World Health Organization's instructions to reduce your risk of infection:

1/ Frequently clean hands by using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water.

2/ When coughing and sneezing cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue - throw issue away immediately and wash hands.

3/ Avoid close contact with anyone that has fever and cough.

Colleen Farrell, MD+ Your Authors @colleenmfarrell Internal medicine resident in New York City. Soon-to-be pulmonary and critical care fellow. Writer. Creator of @MedHumChat. Views mine. Apr. 23, 2020 1 min read + Your Authors

I am so grateful to all the messages of support I've received from family, friends and strangers as I care for patients with #covid_19 in NYC. In my @nytimes debut (!) I share my reflections on how to support frontline healthcare workers in your life.

 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/23/well/live/coronavirus-support-doctors-nurses-communication.html 

Being a doctor at this moment has both joys and heartaches. There's tremendous camaraderie with my coresidents and attendings @BellevueHosp and @nyulangone. It's an honor to care for my patients, but it is so, so painful when they die.

To summarize my tips for supporting the healthcare worker in your life:

1. Send messages of support, without an expectation of reply. I love simple texts like "thinking of you, sending love." Much easier to receive than "How are you doing??"

2. Avoid creating more work for your health care worker. I am *always* grateful for offers for donations. But the logistics of receiving and distributing them is a big logistical challenge. Just something to be mindful of

3. Don’t expect health care workers to also be front-line news reporters. I've frankly been traumatized by some of the things I've seen in the hospital, and it isn't helpful for my healing to keep opening them up. Sometimes I just want to talk about #TigerKing

4. Don’t assume health care workers feel like heroes right now. I know people call us heroes with the best of intentions and deep gratitude, but it can still feel awkward. I don't feel like a hero. I'm just doing my best to care for my patients.

5. Know that we are grateful to you for playing your part. Seriously, thank you thank you thank you to everyone who is #socialdistancing and homeschooling and wearing homemade masks. Prevention is the best medicine!


You can follow @colleenmfarrell.



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