Natalie E. Dean, PhD+ Your Authors @nataliexdean Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at @UF specializing in emerging infectious diseases and vaccine study design. @HarvardBiostats PhD. Tweets my own. May. 28, 2020 1 min read + Your Authors

One thing that attracted me to Twitter is that I like teaching and thinking about teaching. Obviously students and educators are experiencing a massive disruption right now and for the near-term. What does this mean for the way we educate students? A thread 6/6.

First, a story. During London Tube strikes, commuters were forced to temporarily find new routes. Interestingly, even after the strikes ended, a notable fraction of commuters kept their new routes instead of reverting back to their old routes. 2/6
 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp455.pdf 

Shouldn't commuters have already identified their optimal routes before the strikes? The research suggests that maybe they had not truly explored all options, as indeed better routes were out there. Researchers accredit this to "forced experimentation." 3/6

Our forced experiment here is distance learning at a previously unimaginable scale. Of course there are many downsides, but during this period of disruption, can we identify better strategies that we may want to preserve long-term? 4/6

I am nerdy enough that I take online courses for fun, including EdX's "Leaders of Learning." The course divides educational modes into four quadrants based on whether learning is in an order set by the instructor (left) or set by the learner (right). 5/6
 https://medium.com/technology-learning/explore-your-theory-of-learning-765aa163ee14 

Part of me wonders if the disruption of this pandemic could lead to a positive and lasting change in the use of self-directed learning. Certainly seems like now is a good time to experiment. 6/END


You can follow @nataliexdean.



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